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Atlas Collection Image
Digital Camera
Image by San Diego Air & Space Museum Archives
PictionID:53763014 – Catalog:14_032040 – Title:GD/Astronautics Facilities Details: Camera Positions; Complex 14-AMR Date: 06/11/1957 – Filename:14_032040.tif – Images from the Convair/General Dynamics Astronautics Atlas Negative Collection. The processing, cataloging and digitization of these images has been made possible by a generous National Historical Publications and Records grant from the National Archives and Records Administration—Please Tag these images so that the information can be permanently stored with the digital file.—Repository: San Diego Air and Space Museum

Atlas Collection Image
Digital Camera
Image by San Diego Air & Space Museum Archives
PictionID:52514696 – Catalog:14_028234 – Title:GD/Astronautics Facilities Details: AFMTC-Pad 12; Camera Man in Cherrypicker Date: 12/09/1957 – Filename:14_028234.tif – Images from the Convair/General Dynamics Astronautics Atlas Negative Collection. The processing, cataloging and digitization of these images has been made possible by a generous National Historical Publications and Records grant from the National Archives and Records Administration—Please Tag these images so that the information can be permanently stored with the digital file.—Repository: San Diego Air and Space Museum

Image from page 33 of “Handbook for motion picture and stereopticon operators” (1908)
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Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: handbookformotio00jenk
Title: Handbook for motion picture and stereopticon operators
Year: 1908 (1900s)
Authors: Jenkins, C. Francis (Charles Francis), 1867-1934
Subjects: Motion Pictures Motion Picture Technology
Publisher: The Knega Company, inc.
Contributing Library: Niles Essanay Silent Film Museum
Digitizing Sponsor: Media History Digital Library

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Text Appearing Before Image:
MENT. Developing Machines. Having exposed the film in the camera, the nextstep is development. To develop this strip, carry-ing on its gelatine surface some 1600 latent im-ages every 100 feet, is worthy the effort of themost patient photographer, for each picture musthave the same density, remain without stainthroughout, and must be handled so as not to beabraided in any part of its length. Drum Method. The method most in use consists in winding thefilm spirally while dry upon a large drum, the lat-ter supported free to rotate in a semicylindricaltray into which the developing fluid is poured.These drums are usually 3 feet or more in diame-ter and 6 feet or more in length, and driven by amotor, although a crank may, of course, be used.A drum 2 feet in diameter and 2 feet long holds100 feet of film laid close. Pin Cross-Arms. No developing device is, however, so suitable fortravel (and many operators prefer it at home) asa pair of brass cross-bars having vertical pins 28 Motion Picture

Text Appearing After Image:
Operators Handbook 29 driven tightly therein, and known as the pin-jray method. Around these pins the film iswrapped in concentric spirals. The whole is thenset down in the tray and treated much as a large

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