Image from page 105 of “Trigonometria” (1658)

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Image from page 105 of “Trigonometria” (1658)
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Identifier: trigonometria00newt
Title: Trigonometria
Year: 1658 (1650s)
Authors: Newton, J.
Subjects:
Publisher:
Contributing Library: The Computer Museum Archive
Digitizing Sponsor: Gordon Bell

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Text Appearing Before Image:
u^PZ^o ? Logarithme 5 cj.69%91ogo Lettheg!Venriaesbe|7^.^o^2. £ of c5he fines., ; 9.61042134 Difference of the fides PC ^.9348 j

Text Appearing After Image:
1 The fum of the Logarithmes [Aflaol 2 TheLogarithm01 Radiusfquare The bafe . PS 42.1466Diffof the fide PC 5.9348 — T , I9.30939IH 20.0b 000.000 Sum of rhe.bafe 8c diff.EPC 48.0814Dili, of the bafc,8c diff-of the fidcsCY 36.2118 Half the fummeHalf the difference CO 74.0407CK 18.1059 ? Logar. :5£ Sines ■■ – ;… ■ ■ ■ ■: 9.6iooo6©4 ■ . :?49M4H4 – K r__^, i9 10-4514S1^)79306014 3 T he fu mme of the Logarithmes 4 The difference of the futnmes Half the difference Therefore I fay,As the Rectangular of the fine of thefidesTo the fquarc of Radius *So the Kejtangular of the fines of fum and difference of 7 the bafe, and difference (if the fides I & ?gH*9S#fc|? ^o the fquare of the fincoi haif the angle-inquried.. vtf9&ti(Mt Hall is the 1 oganB^m uneofDeg. 51^^965 ■ {■ z] xfliSs^fcQ&W flic double of thYafehis j03.99.p3, , .the a.ngkjPZS inquired. 1L .: ^V9}9, rc?420.00000000 What, and of how great worrhtins LogarithmicaTCompendium is, I jiad ratherir

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Image from page 67 of “Trigonometria” (1658)
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Identifier: trigonometria00newt
Title: Trigonometria
Year: 1658 (1650s)
Authors: Newton, J.
Subjects:
Publisher:
Contributing Library: The Computer Museum Archive
Digitizing Sponsor: Gordon Bell

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ofite to a legy J O r As the Radius,To the leg oppofite to the angle : (°% jTo the fecant of the angle conterminat with the leg : So the whole fine, f ~g ) So the leg conterminate with the angle, To the Hyptenufa. J f• To the Hypotenufa; Prop. 2. Chap, ti Illufiration by Numbers, 1 for the angle B A C. As the leg A B 1123.7943 3.05068684 Totheleg BC605.8601 2.78237235 So the Radius A B 10.00000000 To the tangent of B AC 28.3 3 9.731685532 For the Hypotenufa. As the fine of B AC 28.33 9.<7628i2i To the whole fine 10.00000000 SothelegBC 605.8601 2.78237235 To the Hypotenufa A C 1276,7067 3.10609114 P CHAP eA lirigonometria Britannic a, CHAP. V. Of the Dimenfion of plain Obltquangukt Triangles. T R O B L. i. Tm fides and an angleoppofite to one of them given ; to find the angle oppofite to the other fide.Lithe Obliquangnlar triangle A B C, the obtufe angle A B C is inquired from r CAC 127^.7057 Thegiven) SIdes ^c u%^£ Angle CAB 37.4454 The terms of proportion. ; 1 Ast(lot he <

Text Appearing After Image:
^p- As the one fide,£Jo the other fide* g r So the fine of the angle oppofite to the one fide :To the fine of the angle oppofite to the other fide : Prop. 5»ehap.4. Illtfftration Arithmetical* As the fide BC 80-5.1765 2.93710473 To the fide AC 1276.7067 3.10609114 So the fine of B A C 3 7.4454 9.78390723 Surrime 12.88999837 To the fine of A B C deg. 116.2064 9.95289364 Hence by the complement the other angle A C B deg. 26.3482. Note, Ifthe given angle be obtufe, the fide oppofite thereto lhall be greater then either ofthe reft! and^the other two angles (hall be acute. #:.,;…. .; . . , ^ But ifthe given angle be acute, and the fides given, it will be doubtful whether the angleooDofitc to the greater fide be obtufe, right, or acute, and yet the fourth proportion lhall bealw.ves the fame , namely, the fine of the acute angle, or its complement to two right. Therefore that we maybe certain of what quality the angle is, which is oppofite to theore-itcr fide ~ let there be taken the

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Image from page 172 of “American engineer and railroad journal” (1893)
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Identifier: americanengineer80newy
Title: American engineer and railroad journal
Year: 1893 (1890s)
Authors:
Subjects: Railroad engineering Engineering Railroads Railroad cars
Publisher: New York : M.N. Forney
Contributing Library: Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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by Prof. Wil-liam Ferrel, which cost about ,500, and accurately predictsthe time of high or low tide for a given locality. The ma-chine takes into account 19 different elements which affectthe tide and does the work of 40 expert computers. A newmachine is now being built, which will take into account 39elements which affect the tide, and will operate automatically,making predictions for as long a time as desired. Fobging and Machining Locomotive Frames.—Hammered orforged iron may cost 3c. per lb., while the scrap turnings orborings will not net over Vzc. per lb. If the frame forgemen will work carefully and keep the stock on a main framewithin % in. all over, they will do their work as well ascould be expected; but for every additional 1-16 in. there willbe a dead loss of to . Thus it is not always a questionof how cheaply you can plane frames, but how you can bestforge them.—Mr. C. J. Crowley, Western Railway Club. Commercial Engineer.—In a characteristic address at the

Text Appearing After Image:
AMERICAN 3%-FT. ARM PLAIN RADIAL DRILL. annual smoker of the Railway Club of Pittsburgh, Mr. Geo. A.Post argued that the man who sells things is entitled to adegree, and suggested that he be called a commercial en-gineer. The members of the club were so pleased that theyhave had an abstract of the address attractively printed onlarge sheets of paper suitable for framing. If it is in order,we would suggest that some one start the ball rolling byconferring a masters degree upon Mr. Post. He deserves it. Railroad Y. M. C. A.—Ten years ago the railroad companiespaid 60 per cent, of the cost of the R. R. Y. M. C. A. while themen paid 40 per cent; this last year the companies paid 40per cent, and the men 60.—Central Railway Club. The Mechanical Index.—The Donnell-Colvin Company, 256Broadway, New York, have purchased The Mechanical Indexfrom the publishers of Machinery. The Index will containthe names of all manufacturers of mechanical tools and ap-pliances. Both of the above gentlemen

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