Image from page 312 of “Bell telephone magazine” (1922)

A few nice Computer images I found:

Image from page 312 of “Bell telephone magazine” (1922)
Computer
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Identifier: belltelephonemag4344amerrich
Title: Bell telephone magazine
Year: 1922 (1920s)
Authors: American Telephone and Telegraph Company American Telephone and Telegraph Company. Information Dept
Subjects: Telephone
Publisher: [New York, American Telephone and Telegraph Co., etc.]
Contributing Library: Prelinger Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

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ies, as well as the rest of the BellSystem, it is the beginning of an excitingnew era. 15 A new seminar is helping BellSystem executives preparefor the great changesthe computer is bringing FACING THE FUTURE What is the face of the future? Theemotionless electronic lagade of thecomputer? Or the face of a confidentman—confident with the knowledge ofnew and hitherto unimagined tools athis disposal, tools which will vastly en-hance his own abilities. To make very sure that Bell Systemexecutives see the latter face, a BellSystem Executive Management Semi-nar has been established to enable them to learn about the world of thecomputer. At the 150-year-old CooperInn in historic Cooperstown, NewYork, the Seminar focuses on the eflectof computers on the internal and exter-nal operations of the Bell System, in-cluding information systems. The par-ticipants wrestle with such questionsas: How will computers affect service?What will they mean to us as peopleresponsible for managing the business?

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Image from page 369 of “Bell telephone magazine” (1922)
Computer
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: belltelephonemag4344amerrich
Title: Bell telephone magazine
Year: 1922 (1920s)
Authors: American Telephone and Telegraph Company American Telephone and Telegraph Company. Information Dept
Subjects: Telephone
Publisher: [New York, American Telephone and Telegraph Co., etc.]
Contributing Library: Prelinger Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

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About This Book: Catalog Entry
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it. TheBell Systems Direct Distance Dialingnetwork is a working example of an on-line, real-time system. A few of the obvious factors which havemade a real-time information system im-perative in the Bell System are the tre-mendous growth and the growing com-plexity of the business, new technologiesthat both meet and create new demandsand the consequent multiplicity of man-agement functions. The nex^ds of the fu-ture cannot possibly be met without somemeans of accumulating, processing andtransmitting information on a truly cur-rent basis. Leveling Paper Mountains In the past—and still to a great extentin the present—the means for handlinginformation has been an ancient one:paper. As the business has grown, the When the Bell Sy.sieni hei^an mechanized data processing a few years ago. the state of the artdid not permit fully integrated information systems; operations were divided into parts. Butcapturing source data for machine handling on a piece-part basis was difficult and costly.

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need for information has grown, andconcomitantly the amount of paper forrecording, analyzing, controlling, deci-sion-making, has grown to mountainousproportions. Throughout the Bell Systemand in many other businessc>s there hasbeen duplication of files at many loca-tions, repetition of entries with attendantpossibilities for error, differences in formsused (for the same purpose), delays insummarizing from paper records so thatmuch information is old and perhaps noteven valid when management sees it. The tools and techniques to solve thei:)roblem are now available to us: the newgeneration of computers and the com-munications network. The solution, how-ever, is not so simple as merely hookingcomputers and communications together. For several years now, the Bell Systemhas been actively engaged in electronicdata processing—E.D.P. for short. In themid-1950s, comptrollers in the Systembegan using computers on such large-volume accounting jobs as sorting tolltickets by the millions, pre

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Image from page 4 of “Usus et Fabrica Circini Cuiusdam Proportionis” (1655)
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Identifier: ususetfabricacir00capr
Title: Usus et Fabrica Circini Cuiusdam Proportionis
Year: 1655 (1650s)
Authors: Capra, Balthasar
Subjects:
Publisher:
Contributing Library: The Computer Museum Archive
Digitizing Sponsor: Gordon Bell

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BONONIAE,TypisHH.deDuccijs.i<55J. Superior.Permiffu ILLVSTRISSIMO P R I N C I P I Ac Domino Domino IOACHIMO ERNESTO Marchioni Brandenburgenfi, BoruflLx, Stctini, Po- merani?, Caflubriorum, V Vandalorum, & Sile- fx Duci in Croflh, & Iegerndorflj &c. Burggrauio Norimbergenfi^ €f Prtncipi Rtt~gix, &c*Domino fuo Ciementifsimo. S. P.ususetfabricacir00capr

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Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.