Nice Computer photos

Some cool Computer images:

Image from page 143 of “Sub turri = Under the tower : the yearbook of Boston College” (1913)
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Identifier: subturriundertow1980bost
Title: Sub turri = Under the tower : the yearbook of Boston College
Year: 1913 (1910s)
Authors: Boston College
Subjects: Boston College Boston College
Publisher: [Boston] : The College
Contributing Library: Boston College Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries

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Text Appearing Before Image:
John P. Frates Jr. Arts & SciencesB.A. Economics Kathryn J. Freda Arts & SciencesB.A. English Seniors 139 Alan Gacicia Sue-Ellen Gaffney School of Management School of NursingB.S. Computer Science B.S. Nursing

Text Appearing After Image:
Timothy F. Galage Veronica J. Galante School of Management Arts & SciencesB.S. Accounting B.A. Psychology Lynne M. Fredericks Arts & SciencesB.S. Biology Sheryl B. Freedman Arts & SciencesB.A. Mathematics John G. French Arts & SciencesB.A. EconomicsPsychology Carlos V. Freyre School of ManagementB.S. Accounting

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Image from page 57 of “Bell telephone magazine” (1922)
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Identifier: belltelephonemag4344amerrich
Title: Bell telephone magazine
Year: 1922 (1920s)
Authors: American Telephone and Telegraph Company American Telephone and Telegraph Company. Information Dept
Subjects: Telephone
Publisher: [New York, American Telephone and Telegraph Co., etc.]
Contributing Library: Prelinger Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

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Text Appearing Before Image:
share of the activemarket reached by the Yellow Pages foreach of 53 different categories of productsand services. Before these shares of mar-ket figures were developed, it was nec-essary to determine the size of the totalmarket. Even the exceedingly thoroughU.S. Department of Commerce had nevercompiled these figures. The solution was simple and direct.The interviewee was asked if he had usedthe Yellow Pages one or more times tofind a source of supply for a particularproduct or service. If the answer was yes,he obviously had been in the activemarket. If he said no, he was asked ifhe nonetheless had sought the productor service in some other way. If he thensaid he had, he was also listed as havingbeen in the active market. Figuring theproportion of people who used the YellowPages in the total active market was amatter of simple arithmetic. Before the study was conducted na-tionally, its techniques were pre-tested with hundreds of consumers. Then,in the fall of 1962, these pretests were

Text Appearing After Image:
M. MAGNITUDE of STUDY STUDY PUNNINe t EXECUTIONNo. INTERVIEWS (SATISFACTORY) To Complete Intendews: No. Interviewers workint In fieldNo. Household conUctedNo. Adults 20 and over listed To Process Information: No. Punchcards used to transfer Info.No. figures presented 121 Volumes) No. manhoufs computer programming 70.000 man hrs19,737 incorporated into a pilot study among429 respondents in eight key cities. Theresults of this test led to further refine-ments in techniques. For instance, Audits & Surveys foundthat respondents would grow weary andbored in the course of half an hour ormore of interviewing, especially since thesame battery of questions was asked foreach of the 53 products or services. Thisproblem was solved by giving the respond-ents booklets containing the same cate-gories and questions as those used bythe interviewers. When a respondent hadsomething to do during the interview,fatigue was reduced. To get an idea of the magnitude of thestudy, consider these figures: Pl

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.